Skip Navigation LinksModule 3-Unit 4: Intercultural Communication : HW (14) - Individual

Started: 10/24/2022 10:08 AM
Picture Placeholder: Mugurel Patrichi
Picture: Mugurel Patrichi
  • Mugurel Patrichi

HW (1/4) - Individual

Think of a situation you experienced, where different verbal communication rules lead to misunderstandings or confusion. Describe the situation and try to explain why this miscommunication could occur.  


Output: comment to this post or post a podcast or a short video ​

Picture: Mugurel Patrichi
  • Mugurel Patrichi
http://neptun:80/my/User%20Photos/Profile%20Pictures/mugurel_MThumb.jpg" alt="Picture: Mugurel Patrichi" />
Mugurel Patrichi

Think of a situation you experienced, where different verbal communication rules lead to misunderstandings or confusion. Describe the situation and try to explain why this miscommunication could occur.  


Output: comment to this post or post a podcast or a short video ​

3310/24/2022 10:08 AM10/24/2022 10:08 AMNo
Posted: 10/30/2022 7:27 PM
Picture Placeholder: Gopi Krisshna Tuticorin Harihara Subramanian
Picture Placeholder: Gopi Krisshna Tuticorin Harihara Subramanian
  • Gopi Krisshna Tuticorin Harihara Subramanian

When I speak in German to the native speaker, I mostly understand what they say. But sometimes when they tend to speak a bit faster I could only catch 70% of the words. And sometimes I show myself as being understood. But this affected me in providing the right response. So I ask them once again what they meant or said. This caused confusion or misunderstanding, but later I corrected myself by listening to the conversation a bit more seriously. This helped me in comprehending the context of the conversation irrespective of the pace with which they speak. ​

Picture Placeholder: Gopi Krisshna Tuticorin Harihara Subramanian
  • Gopi Krisshna Tuticorin Harihara Subramanian
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Gopi Krisshna Tuticorin Harihara Subramanian" />
Gopi Krisshna Tuticorin Harihara Subramanian

When I speak in German to the native speaker, I mostly understand what they say. But sometimes when they tend to speak a bit faster I could only catch 70% of the words. And sometimes I show myself as being understood. But this affected me in providing the right response. So I ask them once again what they meant or said. This caused confusion or misunderstanding, but later I corrected myself by listening to the conversation a bit more seriously. This helped me in comprehending the context of the conversation irrespective of the pace with which they speak. ​

Mugurel Patrichi4010/30/2022 7:27 PM10/30/2022 7:27 PM
Posted: 11/3/2022 3:04 PM
Picture Placeholder: Erika Lorena Stöver
Picture Placeholder: Erika Lorena Stöver
  • Erika Lorena Stöver

When I talk to people from other countries in English, sometimes I don't really understand what they are saying. I think it's because of the different sound of the language, for example when I talk to Italians or Indians. ​

Picture Placeholder: Erika Lorena Stöver
  • Erika Lorena Stöver
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Erika Lorena Stöver" />
Erika Lorena Stöver

When I talk to people from other countries in English, sometimes I don't really understand what they are saying. I think it's because of the different sound of the language, for example when I talk to Italians or Indians. ​

Mugurel Patrichi4011/3/2022 3:04 PM11/3/2022 3:04 PM
Posted: 11/10/2022 12:59 PM
Picture Placeholder: Niko Visulaaka
Picture Placeholder: Niko Visulaaka
  • Niko Visulaaka

​Maybe the most typical situation where this kind of these have happened are talking english with people that are from different countries. Usually the situations have persons whose accent is very strong and its hard to catch what they are saying or have to ask few times to get it right. So i and the another person have to be more careful to understand really what the other person is saying so you can answer them correctly. If misunderstandings happen, you just have to talk more about it and make sure that other person knows what you really mean.

Picture Placeholder: Niko Visulaaka
  • Niko Visulaaka
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Niko Visulaaka" />
Niko Visulaaka

​Maybe the most typical situation where this kind of these have happened are talking english with people that are from different countries. Usually the situations have persons whose accent is very strong and its hard to catch what they are saying or have to ask few times to get it right. So i and the another person have to be more careful to understand really what the other person is saying so you can answer them correctly. If misunderstandings happen, you just have to talk more about it and make sure that other person knows what you really mean.

Mugurel Patrichi4011/10/2022 12:59 PM11/10/2022 12:59 PM
Posted: 11/12/2022 10:41 AM
Picture Placeholder: GLADUNEAC M. MIHAELA
Picture Placeholder: GLADUNEAC M. MIHAELA
  • GLADUNEAC M. MIHAELA

In Italy people are very open and friendly, the first thing that comes to mind is to talk to them a little more informally, but this is very rude there, at least even a simple thank you doesn't sound as nice as "thank you very much, Dear ".
So that's what happened to me when I first served the customers, in my opinion, I spoke politely with simple words like "thank you", "please", and "could" but it was not polite enough for the customers. Thus, they thought that I did not respect them, so this was one of the communication problems encountered. so if you are going to Italy, my advice is to be extremely polite and as formal as possible, and your message will surely reach the ears of an Italian.


Picture Placeholder: GLADUNEAC M. MIHAELA
  • GLADUNEAC M. MIHAELA
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: GLADUNEAC M. MIHAELA" />
GLADUNEAC M. MIHAELA

In Italy people are very open and friendly, the first thing that comes to mind is to talk to them a little more informally, but this is very rude there, at least even a simple thank you doesn't sound as nice as "thank you very much, Dear ".
So that's what happened to me when I first served the customers, in my opinion, I spoke politely with simple words like "thank you", "please", and "could" but it was not polite enough for the customers. Thus, they thought that I did not respect them, so this was one of the communication problems encountered. so if you are going to Italy, my advice is to be extremely polite and as formal as possible, and your message will surely reach the ears of an Italian.


Mugurel Patrichi4011/12/2022 10:41 AM11/12/2022 10:41 AM
Posted: 11/13/2022 9:33 AM
Picture Placeholder: Katarzyna Sawicka
Picture Placeholder: Katarzyna Sawicka
  • Katarzyna Sawicka

I was eating a dinner in the restaurant with a group of people from different backgrounds. One of the people there, in my opinion was rude to the waitress as he would only use single words such as the name of the dish, to let her know that this is what he wants to order. I would consider it rude and impolite.

I would prefer if he used full sentences such as 'Could I get..' or 'May I .. '. However, for him it was a normal way of ordering, without getting into unnecessary small talk.

If I was a waitress I would not feel good.​


Picture Placeholder: Katarzyna Sawicka
  • Katarzyna Sawicka
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Katarzyna Sawicka" />
Katarzyna Sawicka

I was eating a dinner in the restaurant with a group of people from different backgrounds. One of the people there, in my opinion was rude to the waitress as he would only use single words such as the name of the dish, to let her know that this is what he wants to order. I would consider it rude and impolite.

I would prefer if he used full sentences such as 'Could I get..' or 'May I .. '. However, for him it was a normal way of ordering, without getting into unnecessary small talk.

If I was a waitress I would not feel good.​


Mugurel Patrichi4011/13/2022 9:33 AM11/13/2022 9:33 AM
Posted: 11/13/2022 10:59 PM
Picture Placeholder: MORARIU M. ROXANA-MIHAELA
Picture Placeholder: MORARIU M. ROXANA-MIHAELA
  • MORARIU M. ROXANA-MIHAELA

​This happened to me when I first arrived in South Korea and started talking to the locals. Whenever I was talking to a person they would, after every couple sentences I was telling, say "aha". This felt very rude to me as I was thinking that they do not care about what I am telling and just want me to finish my stories as soon as possible. Eventually, after bringing up this issue, they said that the meaning behind the aha is very different. On the contrary, they are saying this to make the speaker aware of the fact that they are listening attentively and understand, and are interested in what you are saying.

Picture Placeholder: MORARIU M. ROXANA-MIHAELA
  • MORARIU M. ROXANA-MIHAELA
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: MORARIU M. ROXANA-MIHAELA" />
MORARIU M. ROXANA-MIHAELA

​This happened to me when I first arrived in South Korea and started talking to the locals. Whenever I was talking to a person they would, after every couple sentences I was telling, say "aha". This felt very rude to me as I was thinking that they do not care about what I am telling and just want me to finish my stories as soon as possible. Eventually, after bringing up this issue, they said that the meaning behind the aha is very different. On the contrary, they are saying this to make the speaker aware of the fact that they are listening attentively and understand, and are interested in what you are saying.

Mugurel Patrichi4011/13/2022 10:59 PM11/13/2022 10:59 PM
Posted: 11/20/2022 12:16 AM
Picture Placeholder: TOACA S. ALEXANDRINA
Picture Placeholder: TOACA S. ALEXANDRINA
  • TOACA S. ALEXANDRINA

​​

When I came to Romania to study, I encountered different situations in which my way of expression was not understood by my Romanian colleagues or even by teachers sometimes. Even if I am a native speaker of the Romanian language,  in the Republic of Moldova we still use a lot of Russian words and besides this, we  have an  accent different from the one in Romania, and so what we want to express is not always understood.



Picture Placeholder: TOACA S. ALEXANDRINA
  • TOACA S. ALEXANDRINA
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: TOACA S. ALEXANDRINA" />
TOACA S. ALEXANDRINA

​​

When I came to Romania to study, I encountered different situations in which my way of expression was not understood by my Romanian colleagues or even by teachers sometimes. Even if I am a native speaker of the Romanian language,  in the Republic of Moldova we still use a lot of Russian words and besides this, we  have an  accent different from the one in Romania, and so what we want to express is not always understood.



Mugurel Patrichi4011/20/2022 12:16 AM11/20/2022 12:16 AM
Posted: 11/20/2022 3:17 PM
Picture Placeholder: Miina-Stiina Tanskanen
Picture Placeholder: Miina-Stiina Tanskanen
  • Miina-Stiina Tanskanen

​I've had these misunderstandings which are occurred by differences using volume ​and tone in speaking. In some cultures they tend ​to use higher volume compared to finnish people. The tone is also quite a different in many speaking cultures compared to finnish speaking culture. For example pointing out some mistakes might sound very aggressive as it is meant to be gentle from sight of the speaker. ​

Picture Placeholder: Miina-Stiina Tanskanen
  • Miina-Stiina Tanskanen
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Miina-Stiina Tanskanen" />
Miina-Stiina Tanskanen

​I've had these misunderstandings which are occurred by differences using volume ​and tone in speaking. In some cultures they tend ​to use higher volume compared to finnish people. The tone is also quite a different in many speaking cultures compared to finnish speaking culture. For example pointing out some mistakes might sound very aggressive as it is meant to be gentle from sight of the speaker. ​

Mugurel Patrichi4011/20/2022 3:17 PM11/20/2022 3:17 PM
Posted: 11/20/2022 6:40 PM
Picture Placeholder: Turtureanu Malina
Picture Placeholder: Turtureanu Malina
  • Turtureanu Malina

When I tried to communicate in german with people from Switzerland, I misunderstood some of their words because they didn't speak a pure german, but a specific dialect which is more faster and some words even means different things then in german speak in Germany. They were patient with me and they explained a little how this different dialect works and in the same time we used english to understand each other better. ​

Picture Placeholder: Turtureanu Malina
  • Turtureanu Malina
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Turtureanu Malina" />
Turtureanu Malina

When I tried to communicate in german with people from Switzerland, I misunderstood some of their words because they didn't speak a pure german, but a specific dialect which is more faster and some words even means different things then in german speak in Germany. They were patient with me and they explained a little how this different dialect works and in the same time we used english to understand each other better. ​

Mugurel Patrichi4011/20/2022 6:40 PM11/20/2022 6:40 PM
Posted: 11/20/2022 9:51 PM
Picture Placeholder: Ho Bao Cat Anh
Picture Placeholder: Ho Bao Cat Anh
  • Ho Bao Cat Anh

In Vietnam, we have three different accents in three main regions: northern, middle and southern. I live in the middle part of Vietnam and have the typical accent from this region. It's even difficult for people from the northern and the southern part to understand what I say as I might pronounce some words differently than them and/or use the local ​dialect.  

Picture Placeholder: Ho Bao Cat Anh
  • Ho Bao Cat Anh
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Ho Bao Cat Anh" />
Ho Bao Cat Anh

In Vietnam, we have three different accents in three main regions: northern, middle and southern. I live in the middle part of Vietnam and have the typical accent from this region. It's even difficult for people from the northern and the southern part to understand what I say as I might pronounce some words differently than them and/or use the local ​dialect.  

Mugurel Patrichi4011/20/2022 9:51 PM11/20/2022 9:51 PM
Posted: 11/28/2022 12:05 AM
Picture Placeholder: Anni Hirvonen
Picture Placeholder: Anni Hirvonen
  • Anni Hirvonen

When I speak english to people who are from different country I sometimes have difficulties to understand because of the accent. Then I have to be really careful that I understand it correctly. If the misunderstanding or confusion happend then just have to talk more so that both understand what the other meant. 

Picture Placeholder: Anni Hirvonen
  • Anni Hirvonen
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Anni Hirvonen" />
Anni Hirvonen

When I speak english to people who are from different country I sometimes have difficulties to understand because of the accent. Then I have to be really careful that I understand it correctly. If the misunderstanding or confusion happend then just have to talk more so that both understand what the other meant. 

Mugurel Patrichi4011/28/2022 12:05 AM11/28/2022 12:05 AM
Posted: 12/2/2022 11:15 PM
Picture Placeholder: IACOB I. STELIANA-IRINA
Picture Placeholder: IACOB I. STELIANA-IRINA
  • IACOB I. STELIANA-IRINA

This actually happens to me all the time.  ​I remember the first year I was în Italy that I didn't know the language that well. I was trying tocommunicate with a girl and I wanted to say that a pimple apperead on my face during the night. What was fun is that instead of saying the right word in italian, which would be "brufolo", I said "cestino", meaning trash. The reason behind this was the fact that I was translating from romanian (where the word for pimple is the same as for trash). The girl was very confused, by the way, and I could not blame her for that:))

Picture Placeholder: IACOB I. STELIANA-IRINA
  • IACOB I. STELIANA-IRINA
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: IACOB I. STELIANA-IRINA" />
IACOB I. STELIANA-IRINA

This actually happens to me all the time.  ​I remember the first year I was în Italy that I didn't know the language that well. I was trying tocommunicate with a girl and I wanted to say that a pimple apperead on my face during the night. What was fun is that instead of saying the right word in italian, which would be "brufolo", I said "cestino", meaning trash. The reason behind this was the fact that I was translating from romanian (where the word for pimple is the same as for trash). The girl was very confused, by the way, and I could not blame her for that:))

Mugurel Patrichi4012/2/2022 11:15 PM12/2/2022 11:15 PM
Posted: 12/4/2022 4:33 PM
Picture Placeholder: Jesse Torni
Picture Placeholder: Jesse Torni
  • Jesse Torni

This has happened in multiple occasions and on a weekly basis. One situation of confusion was when I used to talk to one of my international friends from Nigeria. Her English speaking skills were really good, because English is one of the offical languages in Nigeria, but her accent was really hard for me to understand. Some of the words she uses I have rarely ever heard and the pronounciation is different. I learned to understand her better, but I notices that if I don't fully focus on what she was saying in combination with non-verbal communication, I wasn't able to understand what she was saying. The same situation happens sometimes when I try to listen other languages that I have previously studied. The native speakers tend to speak a lot faster that I am able to comprehend, but typically catching just few words will give the idea on what they are talking about. The importance of different pronounciations is especially heavy in French. When I started studying French I quickly understood that even with slight and almost unnoticeable​​ differences in pronouncing, the meaning can completely change.

Picture Placeholder: Jesse Torni
  • Jesse Torni
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Jesse Torni" />
Jesse Torni

This has happened in multiple occasions and on a weekly basis. One situation of confusion was when I used to talk to one of my international friends from Nigeria. Her English speaking skills were really good, because English is one of the offical languages in Nigeria, but her accent was really hard for me to understand. Some of the words she uses I have rarely ever heard and the pronounciation is different. I learned to understand her better, but I notices that if I don't fully focus on what she was saying in combination with non-verbal communication, I wasn't able to understand what she was saying. The same situation happens sometimes when I try to listen other languages that I have previously studied. The native speakers tend to speak a lot faster that I am able to comprehend, but typically catching just few words will give the idea on what they are talking about. The importance of different pronounciations is especially heavy in French. When I started studying French I quickly understood that even with slight and almost unnoticeable​​ differences in pronouncing, the meaning can completely change.

Mugurel Patrichi4012/4/2022 4:33 PM12/4/2022 4:33 PM
Posted: 12/4/2022 10:29 PM
Picture Placeholder: Jose Torres
Picture Placeholder: Jose Torres
  • Jose Torres

​This sort of situations happening frequently between me (American) and my wife (Finnish). Finnish is a very monotonal language, which is why many Finns sound very monotonal when speaking English. My wife has more or less adopted the American accent, with a small hint of British from her years in London. However, on occasion, she can't seem to get any intonation into her speech, which sometimes leads to miscommunication. A big one is when she asks a questions that sounds like a statement. In English, we tend to end the sentence on a high-note when asking a question. For example, "Are you drinking soda?" You end "soda" on a higher-note than what you started with. But sometimes you can take out the question words and simply ask, "You're drinking soda?". What tells you this is a question in speech is that final high-note. My wife sometimes cannot naturally do that, so it comes out sounding like a basic statement "You're drinking soda.", rather than a question. A bit silly but it can get to us.​

Picture Placeholder: Jose Torres
  • Jose Torres
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Jose Torres" />
Jose Torres

​This sort of situations happening frequently between me (American) and my wife (Finnish). Finnish is a very monotonal language, which is why many Finns sound very monotonal when speaking English. My wife has more or less adopted the American accent, with a small hint of British from her years in London. However, on occasion, she can't seem to get any intonation into her speech, which sometimes leads to miscommunication. A big one is when she asks a questions that sounds like a statement. In English, we tend to end the sentence on a high-note when asking a question. For example, "Are you drinking soda?" You end "soda" on a higher-note than what you started with. But sometimes you can take out the question words and simply ask, "You're drinking soda?". What tells you this is a question in speech is that final high-note. My wife sometimes cannot naturally do that, so it comes out sounding like a basic statement "You're drinking soda.", rather than a question. A bit silly but it can get to us.​

Mugurel Patrichi4012/4/2022 10:29 PM12/4/2022 10:29 PM
Posted: 12/7/2022 2:37 PM
Picture Placeholder: DARIE I. LAVINIA TEODORA
Picture Placeholder: DARIE I. LAVINIA TEODORA
  • DARIE I. LAVINIA TEODORA

​I am always confused when talking to my british friend, whose strong accent puts me in a difficult position. I can speak English pretty well, but the prounounciation and way of talking is not really usual to me.

Picture Placeholder: DARIE I. LAVINIA TEODORA
  • DARIE I. LAVINIA TEODORA
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: DARIE I. LAVINIA TEODORA" />
DARIE I. LAVINIA TEODORA

​I am always confused when talking to my british friend, whose strong accent puts me in a difficult position. I can speak English pretty well, but the prounounciation and way of talking is not really usual to me.

Mugurel Patrichi4012/7/2022 2:37 PM12/7/2022 2:37 PM
Edited: 10/3/2023 12:41 PM
Picture Placeholder: Eduarda Filipa Luís Alexandre
Picture Placeholder: Eduarda Filipa Luís Alexandre
  • Eduarda Filipa Luís Alexandre

​When I'm speaking English with another non-native speaker, it sometimes happens that the conversation turns into misunderstandings or sometimes confusion. This is because in different countries there are different ways of learning English and different rules of verbal communication.​ 

Normally during the school summer holidays I work in orchards, picking apples and most of the time there are foreigners working there, most of them Indians. Sometimes, when we talked, there would be some confusion because the way they pronounce some words along with their accent, made me misunderstand what they were saying.  

Furthermore, I experienced another situation, during my Erasmus in high school. Basically, some friends and I wrote a Portuguese sentence into the translator to translate it into English. The problem was that the translator was in Brazilian Portuguese and not Portuguese and there are some differences in vocabulary between Brazil and Portugal, because despite having the same words, some of them have different meanings. So, what happened was that the translator, made the sentence in English, than they read it and were shocked by what we were saying. When we read the sentence, we understood the mistake we were making and explained what we wanted to say.

Picture Placeholder: Eduarda Filipa Luís Alexandre
  • Eduarda Filipa Luís Alexandre
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Eduarda Filipa Luís Alexandre" />
Eduarda Filipa Luís Alexandre

​When I'm speaking English with another non-native speaker, it sometimes happens that the conversation turns into misunderstandings or sometimes confusion. This is because in different countries there are different ways of learning English and different rules of verbal communication.​ 

Normally during the school summer holidays I work in orchards, picking apples and most of the time there are foreigners working there, most of them Indians. Sometimes, when we talked, there would be some confusion because the way they pronounce some words along with their accent, made me misunderstand what they were saying.  

Furthermore, I experienced another situation, during my Erasmus in high school. Basically, some friends and I wrote a Portuguese sentence into the translator to translate it into English. The problem was that the translator was in Brazilian Portuguese and not Portuguese and there are some differences in vocabulary between Brazil and Portugal, because despite having the same words, some of them have different meanings. So, what happened was that the translator, made the sentence in English, than they read it and were shocked by what we were saying. When we read the sentence, we understood the mistake we were making and explained what we wanted to say.

Mugurel Patrichi4010/3/2023 12:38 PM10/3/2023 12:41 PM
Posted: 10/3/2023 11:17 PM
Picture Placeholder: Ricardo Teixeira da Costa Pereira
Picture Placeholder: Ricardo Teixeira da Costa Pereira
  • Ricardo Teixeira da Costa Pereira

​​​In Portugal like many countries there are creole languages that were created by people from other countries to communicate better with the natives. So one thing that really leads me to misunderstanding or confusion is certainly this creole, it has so much difference from portuguese that natives like me don't even know what the speakers of creole are talking about, it almost looks like they are speaking a complete different language.​​

Picture Placeholder: Ricardo Teixeira da Costa Pereira
  • Ricardo Teixeira da Costa Pereira
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Ricardo Teixeira da Costa Pereira" />
Ricardo Teixeira da Costa Pereira

​​​In Portugal like many countries there are creole languages that were created by people from other countries to communicate better with the natives. So one thing that really leads me to misunderstanding or confusion is certainly this creole, it has so much difference from portuguese that natives like me don't even know what the speakers of creole are talking about, it almost looks like they are speaking a complete different language.​​

Mugurel Patrichi4010/3/2023 11:17 PM10/3/2023 11:17 PM
Posted: 10/4/2023 11:43 AM
Picture Placeholder: Ivan Klarin
Picture Placeholder: Ivan Klarin
  • Ivan Klarin

This situation happend to me once while going on sky trip in Switzerland with my high school. As we were in part where german is spoken everyone had difficulties understanding them even tho everyone from my group was learning german in school for several years.  Accent, dialect  and too fast speaking made it too difficult to communicate so we all decidead to speak english whole trip.

Picture Placeholder: Ivan Klarin
  • Ivan Klarin
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Ivan Klarin" />
Ivan Klarin

This situation happend to me once while going on sky trip in Switzerland with my high school. As we were in part where german is spoken everyone had difficulties understanding them even tho everyone from my group was learning german in school for several years.  Accent, dialect  and too fast speaking made it too difficult to communicate so we all decidead to speak english whole trip.

Mugurel Patrichi4010/4/2023 11:43 AM10/4/2023 11:43 AM
Posted: 10/4/2023 1:48 PM
Picture Placeholder: Mayya Statsenko
Picture Placeholder: Mayya Statsenko
  • Mayya Statsenko

When I moved to Portugal and started attending Portuguese school, my classmates were very surprised when they asked me "how are you?" I answered "normal". In Russia, even when people feel well or like something, the answer is always "I'm feel normal" or "it is normal". In Portugal, the term "fine" is  used more and when I answered "normal" my classmates were confused, unable to understand whether I was fine or not.​

Picture Placeholder: Mayya Statsenko
  • Mayya Statsenko
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Mayya Statsenko" />
Mayya Statsenko

When I moved to Portugal and started attending Portuguese school, my classmates were very surprised when they asked me "how are you?" I answered "normal". In Russia, even when people feel well or like something, the answer is always "I'm feel normal" or "it is normal". In Portugal, the term "fine" is  used more and when I answered "normal" my classmates were confused, unable to understand whether I was fine or not.​

Mugurel Patrichi4010/4/2023 1:48 PM10/4/2023 1:48 PM
Posted: 10/4/2023 2:26 PM
Picture Placeholder: Henrique Alves Bastos Lage
Picture Placeholder: Henrique Alves Bastos Lage
  • Henrique Alves Bastos Lage

​During a recent team meeting at university, we were discussing potential changes to our project timeline. One of my colleagues, who comes from a background with a more indirect communication style, presented their thoughts on the topic. Instead of directly stating their preferences, they began by mentioning the potential challenges and difficulties that could arise with the proposed changes. They used subtle hints and didn't express their opinion clearly, which left some of us a bit confused. We're more accustomed to a direct and explicit communication style in our team. As a result, we weren't sure whether our colleague was in favor of the changes or had reservations about them. This miscommunication happened due to the differences in our communication styles, and it required some follow-up questions to clarify their stance and ensure everyone was on the same page.
​​

Picture Placeholder: Henrique Alves Bastos Lage
  • Henrique Alves Bastos Lage
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Henrique Alves Bastos Lage" />
Henrique Alves Bastos Lage

​During a recent team meeting at university, we were discussing potential changes to our project timeline. One of my colleagues, who comes from a background with a more indirect communication style, presented their thoughts on the topic. Instead of directly stating their preferences, they began by mentioning the potential challenges and difficulties that could arise with the proposed changes. They used subtle hints and didn't express their opinion clearly, which left some of us a bit confused. We're more accustomed to a direct and explicit communication style in our team. As a result, we weren't sure whether our colleague was in favor of the changes or had reservations about them. This miscommunication happened due to the differences in our communication styles, and it required some follow-up questions to clarify their stance and ensure everyone was on the same page.
​​

Mugurel Patrichi4010/4/2023 2:26 PM10/4/2023 2:26 PM
1 - 20Next