Skip Navigation LinksModule 3-Unit 4: Intercultural Communication : HW (24) - Individual

Started: 10/24/2022 10:07 AM
Picture Placeholder: Mugurel Patrichi
Picture: Mugurel Patrichi
  • Mugurel Patrichi

HW (2/4) - Individual

​Think of a situation you experienced, where different non-verbal communication rules lead to misunderstandings or confusion. Describe the situation and try to explain why this miscommunication could occur. 


Output: comment to this post or post a podcast or a short video ​


Picture: Mugurel Patrichi
  • Mugurel Patrichi
http://neptun:80/my/User%20Photos/Profile%20Pictures/mugurel_MThumb.jpg" alt="Picture: Mugurel Patrichi" />
Mugurel Patrichi

​Think of a situation you experienced, where different non-verbal communication rules lead to misunderstandings or confusion. Describe the situation and try to explain why this miscommunication could occur. 


Output: comment to this post or post a podcast or a short video ​


2310/24/2022 10:07 AM10/24/2022 10:07 AMNo
Posted: 10/26/2022 12:26 PM
Picture Placeholder: Hanna Dinser
Picture Placeholder: Hanna Dinser
  • Hanna Dinser

​In Mexico there is a handsign (showing the back of your hand to the person) which means "Thank you". I intepreted it differently and thought the guy wants to show me his ring and I was confused. The misscommunicatio  obviusly occurs bacause I didn´t know the sign. ​

Picture Placeholder: Hanna Dinser
  • Hanna Dinser
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Hanna Dinser" />
Hanna Dinser

​In Mexico there is a handsign (showing the back of your hand to the person) which means "Thank you". I intepreted it differently and thought the guy wants to show me his ring and I was confused. The misscommunicatio  obviusly occurs bacause I didn´t know the sign. ​

Mugurel Patrichi3010/26/2022 12:26 PM10/26/2022 12:26 PM
Posted: 11/1/2022 2:37 PM
Picture Placeholder: Carolin Rothemeyer
Picture Placeholder: Carolin Rothemeyer
  • Carolin Rothemeyer

​In Malaysia the sign for paying/ i want the bill/ is the hand sign in writing on a paper in the air. For us in Germany we use a gesture of rubbing our fingers against each other which is seen as ​​bribery sign in Malaysia. So we had some funny experiences in the restaurants​

Picture Placeholder: Carolin Rothemeyer
  • Carolin Rothemeyer
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Carolin Rothemeyer" />
Carolin Rothemeyer

​In Malaysia the sign for paying/ i want the bill/ is the hand sign in writing on a paper in the air. For us in Germany we use a gesture of rubbing our fingers against each other which is seen as ​​bribery sign in Malaysia. So we had some funny experiences in the restaurants​

Mugurel Patrichi3011/1/2022 2:37 PM11/1/2022 2:37 PM
Posted: 11/12/2022 10:46 AM
Picture Placeholder: GLADUNEAC M. MIHAELA
Picture Placeholder: GLADUNEAC M. MIHAELA
  • GLADUNEAC M. MIHAELA

In Italy you often come across situations like this, Italian itself is full of gestures, and I encountered a similar situation during the internship, it was a situation where a client gestured something and I simply understood that he swears because that's what I saw the manager do every time he swears. and I simply did not take into account that after the client came to me, she told me that it only want to have a cup of coffee and that this is the sign for an espresso.​

Picture Placeholder: GLADUNEAC M. MIHAELA
  • GLADUNEAC M. MIHAELA
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: GLADUNEAC M. MIHAELA" />
GLADUNEAC M. MIHAELA

In Italy you often come across situations like this, Italian itself is full of gestures, and I encountered a similar situation during the internship, it was a situation where a client gestured something and I simply understood that he swears because that's what I saw the manager do every time he swears. and I simply did not take into account that after the client came to me, she told me that it only want to have a cup of coffee and that this is the sign for an espresso.​

Mugurel Patrichi3011/12/2022 10:46 AM11/12/2022 10:46 AM
Posted: 11/13/2022 9:32 AM
Picture Placeholder: Katarzyna Sawicka
Picture Placeholder: Katarzyna Sawicka
  • Katarzyna Sawicka

When I moved to United Kingdom, specifically England when I was in a bar, I wanted to order 2 beers. But because it was so loud in the bar, and the bartender could not hear me, I showed that by hand and it was a mistake. The bartender gave me a weird look and my friend who was with me at the time, told me that I should not be showing it ever. The reason for that is the way I showed number two on my hand was the way that British people show offensive gesture that I have never heard about.

 The gesture is a s follow: when holding a palm of your hand up the index finger and middle make a 'V' shape, the other fingers are curled into the palm and the palm is facing towards the gesturer.



Picture Placeholder: Katarzyna Sawicka
  • Katarzyna Sawicka
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Katarzyna Sawicka" />
Katarzyna Sawicka

When I moved to United Kingdom, specifically England when I was in a bar, I wanted to order 2 beers. But because it was so loud in the bar, and the bartender could not hear me, I showed that by hand and it was a mistake. The bartender gave me a weird look and my friend who was with me at the time, told me that I should not be showing it ever. The reason for that is the way I showed number two on my hand was the way that British people show offensive gesture that I have never heard about.

 The gesture is a s follow: when holding a palm of your hand up the index finger and middle make a 'V' shape, the other fingers are curled into the palm and the palm is facing towards the gesturer.



Mugurel Patrichi3011/13/2022 9:32 AM11/13/2022 9:32 AM
Posted: 11/16/2022 9:44 AM
Picture Placeholder: Alissa Kasurinen
Picture Placeholder: Alissa Kasurinen
  • Alissa Kasurinen

In Sweden we like to hug our friends and even people we meet for the first time. This is considered friendly. In Finland, people don’t like to be touched that much. When I first moved here, I was very confused when people went in for a handshake instead of a hug. 



Picture Placeholder: Alissa Kasurinen
  • Alissa Kasurinen
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Alissa Kasurinen" />
Alissa Kasurinen

In Sweden we like to hug our friends and even people we meet for the first time. This is considered friendly. In Finland, people don’t like to be touched that much. When I first moved here, I was very confused when people went in for a handshake instead of a hug. 



Mugurel Patrichi3011/16/2022 9:44 AM11/16/2022 9:44 AM
Posted: 11/20/2022 12:18 AM
Picture Placeholder: TOACA S. ALEXANDRINA
Picture Placeholder: TOACA S. ALEXANDRINA
  • TOACA S. ALEXANDRINA

​​I didn't have any such experience, but I remember how my sister, who has been living in Italy for some time, told me about Italian gestures. For example, when Italians scratch their chins, it means that the discussed situation is completely indifferent to them. Initially, she did not know the meaning of this gesture and used it incorrectly. When she found out its meaning, she felt so uncomfortable because she could have offended someone in the discussion. ​​​​

Picture Placeholder: TOACA S. ALEXANDRINA
  • TOACA S. ALEXANDRINA
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: TOACA S. ALEXANDRINA" />
TOACA S. ALEXANDRINA

​​I didn't have any such experience, but I remember how my sister, who has been living in Italy for some time, told me about Italian gestures. For example, when Italians scratch their chins, it means that the discussed situation is completely indifferent to them. Initially, she did not know the meaning of this gesture and used it incorrectly. When she found out its meaning, she felt so uncomfortable because she could have offended someone in the discussion. ​​​​

Mugurel Patrichi3011/20/2022 12:18 AM11/20/2022 12:18 AM
Posted: 11/20/2022 9:05 AM
Picture Placeholder: Joonas Pulkkinen
Picture Placeholder: Joonas Pulkkinen
  • Joonas Pulkkinen

When I was younger we went on a family vacation in Bulgaria. Now, my parents told me that in Bulgaria shaking your head from side to side is a sign of saying "yes". This is the opposite in Finland. You can probably already guess the confusion. Even tho I knew it meant "yes" in Bulgaria, I just couldn't believe it at the time as it was so normal thing in Finland that shaking your head was a "no". So I remember one instance where a local asked me something, it was a "yes" or a "no" question and I remembered what my parents told me but I still was hesitant to shake my head as a sign of yes. So what happened was, I began kind of circling my head around as I wasn't sure what to do. I got the message across eventually but it was a funny instance thinking back.​

Picture Placeholder: Joonas Pulkkinen
  • Joonas Pulkkinen
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Joonas Pulkkinen" />
Joonas Pulkkinen

When I was younger we went on a family vacation in Bulgaria. Now, my parents told me that in Bulgaria shaking your head from side to side is a sign of saying "yes". This is the opposite in Finland. You can probably already guess the confusion. Even tho I knew it meant "yes" in Bulgaria, I just couldn't believe it at the time as it was so normal thing in Finland that shaking your head was a "no". So I remember one instance where a local asked me something, it was a "yes" or a "no" question and I remembered what my parents told me but I still was hesitant to shake my head as a sign of yes. So what happened was, I began kind of circling my head around as I wasn't sure what to do. I got the message across eventually but it was a funny instance thinking back.​

Mugurel Patrichi3011/20/2022 9:05 AM11/20/2022 9:05 AM
Posted: 11/20/2022 4:58 PM
Picture Placeholder: Miina-Stiina Tanskanen
Picture Placeholder: Miina-Stiina Tanskanen
  • Miina-Stiina Tanskanen

​I have been on a situation in which i took an eye contact with a wrong person. That was interpreted as unrespectful ​​sign. At that time I hadn't any clue of this kind of difference between finnish culture and the culture in question. It is polite to take eye contact with people you meet in Finland, but it doesn't mean it's valid everywhere. 

Picture Placeholder: Miina-Stiina Tanskanen
  • Miina-Stiina Tanskanen
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Miina-Stiina Tanskanen" />
Miina-Stiina Tanskanen

​I have been on a situation in which i took an eye contact with a wrong person. That was interpreted as unrespectful ​​sign. At that time I hadn't any clue of this kind of difference between finnish culture and the culture in question. It is polite to take eye contact with people you meet in Finland, but it doesn't mean it's valid everywhere. 

Mugurel Patrichi3011/20/2022 4:58 PM11/20/2022 4:58 PM
Posted: 11/20/2022 9:55 PM
Picture Placeholder: Ho Bao Cat Anh
Picture Placeholder: Ho Bao Cat Anh
  • Ho Bao Cat Anh

People in Vietnam don't hug as a way of greeting. Some of my German friend used to think that I was a distant person at first because I din't initiate the hug when we met or said goodbye. 

Picture Placeholder: Ho Bao Cat Anh
  • Ho Bao Cat Anh
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Ho Bao Cat Anh" />
Ho Bao Cat Anh

People in Vietnam don't hug as a way of greeting. Some of my German friend used to think that I was a distant person at first because I din't initiate the hug when we met or said goodbye. 

Mugurel Patrichi3011/20/2022 9:55 PM11/20/2022 9:55 PM
Posted: 11/22/2022 9:20 PM
Picture Placeholder: Foroughian Vafa
Picture Placeholder: Foroughian Vafa
  • Foroughian Vafa

So in India (specially for kids or youngsters) raising the little finger indicates "I need to go to the tolit and urinate"! Since i was not really familiar with such hand gesture (If you think about the number 1 you can probably relate to it) I was terribly confused. 

One more example was when I was riding a bike in India and another biker showed the palm of his hand and repeatedly closed and opend it (Imagine the famous Italian hand gesture but facing you), then I realized he was trying to say that my fron light is on!​

 

Picture Placeholder: Foroughian Vafa
  • Foroughian Vafa
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Foroughian Vafa" />
Foroughian Vafa

So in India (specially for kids or youngsters) raising the little finger indicates "I need to go to the tolit and urinate"! Since i was not really familiar with such hand gesture (If you think about the number 1 you can probably relate to it) I was terribly confused. 

One more example was when I was riding a bike in India and another biker showed the palm of his hand and repeatedly closed and opend it (Imagine the famous Italian hand gesture but facing you), then I realized he was trying to say that my fron light is on!​

 

Mugurel Patrichi3011/22/2022 9:20 PM11/22/2022 9:20 PM
Posted: 11/22/2022 10:09 PM
Picture Placeholder: Soman Archana
Picture Placeholder: Soman Archana
  • Soman Archana

My experience of misinterpreting non-verbal language in Malaysia. When I was in Malaysia a few years ago, I asked a Malay person to show me the way to the supermarket. Instead of pointing with his index finger, he pointed in the direction with his thumb finger. It was very new to me because I used to think that everyone in every country would use the index finger to point.​​​​

Picture Placeholder: Soman Archana
  • Soman Archana
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Soman Archana" />
Soman Archana

My experience of misinterpreting non-verbal language in Malaysia. When I was in Malaysia a few years ago, I asked a Malay person to show me the way to the supermarket. Instead of pointing with his index finger, he pointed in the direction with his thumb finger. It was very new to me because I used to think that everyone in every country would use the index finger to point.​​​​

Mugurel Patrichi3011/22/2022 10:09 PM11/22/2022 10:09 PM
Posted: 11/23/2022 11:02 AM
Picture Placeholder: Nekundi Rosalinde Nasaantu
Picture Placeholder: Nekundi Rosalinde Nasaantu
  • Nekundi Rosalinde Nasaantu

I had once experinced a moment of confusion during my travels whereby I made a gesture with my hands which meant something completely different to the Italians and it was a bit awkward as in my country its not neccesarily insulting but within their culture it is used as an insult. 

Picture Placeholder: Nekundi Rosalinde Nasaantu
  • Nekundi Rosalinde Nasaantu
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Nekundi Rosalinde Nasaantu" />
Nekundi Rosalinde Nasaantu

I had once experinced a moment of confusion during my travels whereby I made a gesture with my hands which meant something completely different to the Italians and it was a bit awkward as in my country its not neccesarily insulting but within their culture it is used as an insult. 

Mugurel Patrichi3011/23/2022 11:02 AM11/23/2022 11:02 AM
Posted: 11/28/2022 4:32 PM
Picture Placeholder: IACOB I. STELIANA-IRINA
Picture Placeholder: IACOB I. STELIANA-IRINA
  • IACOB I. STELIANA-IRINA

The first thing that crosses my mind is the italian gesture that means "later".

I was clubbing with a group of friends one night but I was so tired that I wanted to come back home the earliest possible. So, what I did was to ask the girl driving when we would have left. She then answered me with that fingers gesture, that for me meant "repeat", not "later". So I ask her again and she answers the same thing, again. In the end, I did not receive an appropiate answer but at least I found out what that gesture really meant.


Picture Placeholder: IACOB I. STELIANA-IRINA
  • IACOB I. STELIANA-IRINA
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: IACOB I. STELIANA-IRINA" />
IACOB I. STELIANA-IRINA

The first thing that crosses my mind is the italian gesture that means "later".

I was clubbing with a group of friends one night but I was so tired that I wanted to come back home the earliest possible. So, what I did was to ask the girl driving when we would have left. She then answered me with that fingers gesture, that for me meant "repeat", not "later". So I ask her again and she answers the same thing, again. In the end, I did not receive an appropiate answer but at least I found out what that gesture really meant.


Mugurel Patrichi3011/28/2022 4:32 PM11/28/2022 4:32 PM
Edited: 12/2/2022 10:10 PM
Picture Placeholder: LIVITCHI V. MARIA-ELENA
Picture Placeholder: LIVITCHI V. MARIA-ELENA
  • LIVITCHI V. MARIA-ELENA

​One time I got confused by the sign Italians use for "later". I took it as "repeat". So I was repeating again and again the same thing, an so was doing my interlocutor. I was like "are you ​kidding me?", and I got her also so confused. For sure, miscommunication can occur​, but I always see it as an opportunity to learn new things. It might go pretty wrong when a gesture is insulting someone, this is why metacommunication is such a complex but so important thing, from my point of view. While doing my internship in Greece, I had long conversations with my Greek friend about gestures, most of them I was getting right, as I am close to the balkan cultural background. ​​

Picture Placeholder: LIVITCHI V. MARIA-ELENA
  • LIVITCHI V. MARIA-ELENA
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: LIVITCHI V. MARIA-ELENA" />
LIVITCHI V. MARIA-ELENA

​One time I got confused by the sign Italians use for "later". I took it as "repeat". So I was repeating again and again the same thing, an so was doing my interlocutor. I was like "are you ​kidding me?", and I got her also so confused. For sure, miscommunication can occur​, but I always see it as an opportunity to learn new things. It might go pretty wrong when a gesture is insulting someone, this is why metacommunication is such a complex but so important thing, from my point of view. While doing my internship in Greece, I had long conversations with my Greek friend about gestures, most of them I was getting right, as I am close to the balkan cultural background. ​​

Mugurel Patrichi3012/2/2022 10:09 PM12/2/2022 10:10 PM
Posted: 12/4/2022 11:00 PM
Picture Placeholder: Jose Torres
Picture Placeholder: Jose Torres
  • Jose Torres

​Here in Finland, I've noticed that when giving public speeches, politicians use very little hand gestures and maintain very calm and poised. Politicians in the USA, France, and Italy are not afraid to make big hand gestures, raise their voices, and even shout at times. This was a topic of discussion for me and my wife in that she believes that these politicians outside of Finland are being somewhat unprofessional with all the gestures and overt emotion, where as I argue the Finnish approach can come of as robotic.​

Picture Placeholder: Jose Torres
  • Jose Torres
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Jose Torres" />
Jose Torres

​Here in Finland, I've noticed that when giving public speeches, politicians use very little hand gestures and maintain very calm and poised. Politicians in the USA, France, and Italy are not afraid to make big hand gestures, raise their voices, and even shout at times. This was a topic of discussion for me and my wife in that she believes that these politicians outside of Finland are being somewhat unprofessional with all the gestures and overt emotion, where as I argue the Finnish approach can come of as robotic.​

Mugurel Patrichi3012/4/2022 11:00 PM12/4/2022 11:00 PM
Edited: 10/3/2023 12:57 PM
Picture Placeholder: Eduarda Filipa Luís Alexandre
Picture Placeholder: Eduarda Filipa Luís Alexandre
  • Eduarda Filipa Luís Alexandre

​As I have already explained in my other assignments, during high school I participated in Erasmus and I hosted an Estonian girl in my house. You probably know, Northern Europeans are more reserved than Southern Europeans, who love to touch each other during conversations and all that stuff. When I saw her for the first time I was so excited, that I did everything that maybe I shouldn't have done. I greeted her with a kiss on both cheeks and I started asking her a lot of questions, trying to get to know her better. That, I understood that I was being to invasive​ and that she was feeling overwhelmed with so many questions, so I changed my attitude to make her more comfortable​​.

Picture Placeholder: Eduarda Filipa Luís Alexandre
  • Eduarda Filipa Luís Alexandre
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Eduarda Filipa Luís Alexandre" />
Eduarda Filipa Luís Alexandre

​As I have already explained in my other assignments, during high school I participated in Erasmus and I hosted an Estonian girl in my house. You probably know, Northern Europeans are more reserved than Southern Europeans, who love to touch each other during conversations and all that stuff. When I saw her for the first time I was so excited, that I did everything that maybe I shouldn't have done. I greeted her with a kiss on both cheeks and I started asking her a lot of questions, trying to get to know her better. That, I understood that I was being to invasive​ and that she was feeling overwhelmed with so many questions, so I changed my attitude to make her more comfortable​​.

Mugurel Patrichi3010/3/2023 12:56 PM10/3/2023 12:57 PM
Posted: 10/3/2023 7:38 PM
Picture Placeholder: Tin Horvat
Picture Placeholder: Tin Horvat
  • Tin Horvat

​When I was on my summer vacation in Italy with my family and our Italian friends I noticed that many Italians were pointing to their mouth as they were eating. In some places in Italy that is how they want to make a gesture to the bartender that the food is very delicious, I tough they were pointing to their mouth because something was wrong with their tooth.

Picture Placeholder: Tin Horvat
  • Tin Horvat
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Tin Horvat" />
Tin Horvat

​When I was on my summer vacation in Italy with my family and our Italian friends I noticed that many Italians were pointing to their mouth as they were eating. In some places in Italy that is how they want to make a gesture to the bartender that the food is very delicious, I tough they were pointing to their mouth because something was wrong with their tooth.

Mugurel Patrichi3010/3/2023 7:38 PM10/3/2023 7:38 PM
Posted: 10/5/2023 6:09 PM
Picture Placeholder: Anastácia Chihai
Picture Placeholder: Anastácia Chihai
  • Anastácia Chihai

In Portugal in general we're touchy and greet each other with 1 or 2 kisses on the cheek.​ When I go to Moldova I get a little lost when people go for the third kiss because they greet each other with 3 kisses and I forget about that almost all the time. 

Picture Placeholder: Anastácia Chihai
  • Anastácia Chihai
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Anastácia Chihai" />
Anastácia Chihai

In Portugal in general we're touchy and greet each other with 1 or 2 kisses on the cheek.​ When I go to Moldova I get a little lost when people go for the third kiss because they greet each other with 3 kisses and I forget about that almost all the time. 

Mugurel Patrichi3010/5/2023 6:09 PM10/5/2023 6:09 PM
Posted: 10/5/2023 7:39 PM
Picture Placeholder: Lovre Raffanelli
Picture Placeholder: Lovre Raffanelli
  • Lovre Raffanelli

Often German people come across really angry, but in reality they are not. Most of them come across cold, distant and always nervous, always tapping their foot and having a straight face, which makes everybody think that they have a certain problem with the service or smth. In 90% of situations, they are really cheerful people, but they just don't show it at first.

Picture Placeholder: Lovre Raffanelli
  • Lovre Raffanelli
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Lovre Raffanelli" />
Lovre Raffanelli

Often German people come across really angry, but in reality they are not. Most of them come across cold, distant and always nervous, always tapping their foot and having a straight face, which makes everybody think that they have a certain problem with the service or smth. In 90% of situations, they are really cheerful people, but they just don't show it at first.

Mugurel Patrichi3010/5/2023 7:39 PM10/5/2023 7:39 PM
Posted: 10/5/2023 9:29 PM
Picture Placeholder: Filip Stipaničev
Picture Placeholder: Filip Stipaničev
  • Filip Stipaničev

​I never experienced this kind of situation, but I heard that in Bulgaria shaking you head side to side means yes and shaking your head back and forth means no. In Croatia shaking your head side to side means no and shaking your head back and forth means yes, so I see how this could lead to misunderstanding in communication.

Picture Placeholder: Filip Stipaničev
  • Filip Stipaničev
/_layouts/15/images/person.gif" alt="Picture Placeholder: Filip Stipaničev" />
Filip Stipaničev

​I never experienced this kind of situation, but I heard that in Bulgaria shaking you head side to side means yes and shaking your head back and forth means no. In Croatia shaking your head side to side means no and shaking your head back and forth means yes, so I see how this could lead to misunderstanding in communication.

Mugurel Patrichi3010/5/2023 9:29 PM10/5/2023 9:29 PM
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